technology, Uncategorized

GraphFree

I try not to just promote apps and websites but I found a gem for anyone wanting to create their own math content.  You know how pre-created material have those fancy official looking graphs?  With arrows at both ends! GraphFree.com is exactly what you’ve been looking for. Scatter plots for line of fit practice, one and two variable inequalities, any function… they all look good.

Why do I create my own content?  I differentiate instruction in my classroom and I’m always needing more practice for standards. This site has been amazing for creating these resources. I’ve used them in Google docs and slide activities too.  The image quality is great.

I didn’t show it on the graphs below, but you can label and number each axis. It’s very versatile.

If you try it out and like it, let me know!

Geometry, technology, Uncategorized

Superhero Transformations

I found this project a few years ago and I’ve had the students create them on paper.  The products are always very impressive and students love the project.  The original link can be found here. This year I wanted the students to create online using Google Docs and Draw.  It was a little bit of a learning curve, but I like that the student used the transformation tools built into Google Docs.  I’ve posted a few examples below and also my updated version of the original project I linked to above.  It really helps the students visualize transformations and helps them use this vocabulary in context of their situation.

Comic Transformation Map - Madelyn Fuller

StudentSampleforTransformationcomic

ComicStripTransformationexample2

Documents

Information Sheet & Scoring Guide

proofs, Solving Equations, technology

Drag & Drop with Google Slides & Draw

When we got our iPads, I wanted some interactive activities for my students.  Using Pages, I created my first drag & drop activity.  When we transitioned to Chrome, I also transitioned my platform.  I started using Google Draw.  I created one page proofs for students to practice with, taken from a paper activity I used year after year.

Screen Shot 2015-11-28 at 11.09.08 PM

Once I figured out how to force a copy for slides (now Classroom does it for me!) I started making multiple practice pages with slides. Now I have a huge selection of activities that I use with all of my classes.  I’ve shared some below.

Geometry Proofs (see above)

Performance Event

Solving Equations

Protractor Practice

Writing Linear Equations

Students love using these activities, especially the Solving Equations & Writing Equations when they can work at their own pace.  I used both of these as remediation for standards students were stuck on.  It was a success!  I hope you find some inspiration with these and begin making some of your own.  Please share if you do!

linear regression, PBL, technology

Barbie Bungee

Our Unit 2 linear equations project was the famous Barbie Bungee from Illuminations.  We added a creation component, a poster created as a full color magazine advertisement, to the project so the students would have an end product.  Students love to make Barbie bungee, a lot of them also loved creating the poster.  There was some disconnect between the two and some of their products had to be corrected to reflect their learning. Overall, we had some great practice creating linear regression equations & interpreting slope and intercepts.

2015-09-24 09.55.35 2015-09-24 09.52.54 2015-09-24 09.49.33

Barbie Bungee Unit 2 activity

EdWeek, technology

#SJSDEdWeek Summary

Ed Week 2015 Logo

SJSDEdWeek 2015 was a huge success.  It’s always an awesome experience when you can learn with and from your fellow colleagues.  Our 3 speakers were amazing and challenged us to look at learning differently. I have posted the links to the presentations below.  You can also follow #SJSDEdWeek on Twitter.  We have folks still tweeting at the hashtag when they use something we’ve learned.

Day 1: highlight video

Josh Stumpenhorst – Lessons from the Run

Stumpenhorst keynote sketch note

Josh Stumpenhorst – Social Media

Google Gab

Symbaloo

Day 2:  highlight video

Eric Langhorst – Leveraging Technology to Enhance the Classroom Experience Langhorst keynote sketch note

Eric Langhorst- Twitter and other Social Media

All of Eric’s resources

Use This Not That

Day 3: highlight video

Justin Tarte – #futureready schools and the digital mindset

Tarte keynote sketch note

Justin Tarte – STEAMing full speed ahead with learning
Tech Showcase

formative assessment, technology

Plickers

Our building focus this year is to incorporate exit slips into our daily routine.  There are so many really awesome programs and apps available that will grade and compile data for you.  Over the next few day, I plan to share some of the programs I have tried and found helpful (or fun)!

PlickersPlickers blew up on Twitter not long ago, so I had to see what the fuss was about.  This program definitely falls into the fun category.  I don’t use it every day, but it is a fun way to quickly assess vocabulary or a skill. I have tried this when students need to calculate and it doesn’t work as well.

Plickers uses the plickers.com website and an app for Apple or Android devices.  Students have a unique QR code and hold it up with the letter (ABC or D) facing up and the teacher scans the codes using a phone or tablet.  It instantly reads the answers and displays the results on the screen.  You can assign a card to a student and review the results later.  It doesn’t have the best reporting system and it doesn’t compile data for you.  It is fun and the students love seeing their name pop up on the screen when I scan their card.

Plickers 2This is a screen shot from a one question assessment I used to introduce my PD session in January.

Give Plickers a try.  I have quite a few teachers in my school who have tried this and they are also hooked!

iPad, technology

Comic Book Word Problems

Another project I developed this year used the  Comic Life app. The app is very easy to use and as you can see from the examples posted, students can use any type of image they want and still make a great comic.  The students’ task was to write a word problem in comic form.  They had to set up the situation, create an equation and solve it, all within comic.

The first comic is the example I gave the students, followed by the scoring guide, also created in Comic Life.

The next two examples are student projects.  While they may not have scored full points on these comics, they still put some effort into it and clearly enjoyed the experience.


This project was originally posted on SJSDMath.posterous.com

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